FCA Greenlights Worldline for the UK Fintech Expansion

by Damian Chmiel
  • Worldline strengthens in the UK post-Brexit with FCA payment license.
  • The new authorization will allow the company to expand in the country.
FCA
Bloomberg
Join our Telegram channel

In a significant development for the UK's post-Brexit financial landscape, Worldline, the French-based payments processor, has received Payment Institution Authorization from the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). This paves the way for Worldline to bolster its UK operations and enhance its service offerings for merchants both within the country and internationally.

Worldline Acquires FCA Payment Institution Authorization

Worldline's new status comes as an important move following years of providing payment solutions to UK and global clients. The company's consolidation of merchant activities within the UK aims to amplify its investment in services tailored to the local market. The authorization by the FCA not only aligns Worldline with UK regulatory standards but also ensures uninterrupted services amid the closing of the Temporary Permission Regime.

With this license, Worldline can now offer domestic processing capabilities, addressing the market's changing needs with its fully in-house acquiring services. This move is expected to enhance transaction transparency and reliability for Worldline's customers.

“Worldline is committed to playing an important role in the post-Brexit payments landscape of the UK,” said Lee Jones, the CEO of Worldline Merchant Services UK.

An expanded UK-based team of Worldline professionals will utilize their market expertise to assist merchants in optimizing payment operations and costs. The new licence will enable merchants to benefit from optimized scheme fees and, with the assistance of advanced AI technologies, experience improved authorization rates.

“Paramount for our local service scope and excellence, it sets us apart from many international competitors by bolstering our presence and enhancing our service capabilities, while providing more choice for UK merchants,” Jones added.

Market Valuation Challenges for Worldline

Worldline recently announced a reduction in its sales forecast, causing concern within the European financial technology sector. The news led to a sharp decline in Worldline's shares, resulting in a loss of over half of its market capitalization, approximately €3.8 billion, and leaving the company with a valuation of approximately €2.7 billion. This significant devaluation reflects a growing trend of investor skepticism towards the long-term viability of fintech enterprises in Europe.

This unsettling update from Worldline arrived closely on the heels of a similar announcement by CAB Payments Plc, a UK-based company, which experienced a dramatic slump of 72% in its stock value following a downward revision of its revenue outlook. Furthermore, in August, the payment firm Adyen NV was subjected to a market sell-off after posting disappointing bi-annual results. These events have cumulatively contributed to a discernible shift in investor sentiment, marked by diminishing patience with the performance of fintech entities across Europe.

In light of these developments, data from KPMG's Pulse of Fintech report is particularly telling. While fintech investments totaled $63.2 billion over 2,885 deals in the latter half of 2022, these figures dropped to $52.4 billion through 2,153 deals in the first half of 2023. The report underscores a notable contraction in the sector, both in terms of capital inflow and deal volume.

In a significant development for the UK's post-Brexit financial landscape, Worldline, the French-based payments processor, has received Payment Institution Authorization from the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). This paves the way for Worldline to bolster its UK operations and enhance its service offerings for merchants both within the country and internationally.

Worldline Acquires FCA Payment Institution Authorization

Worldline's new status comes as an important move following years of providing payment solutions to UK and global clients. The company's consolidation of merchant activities within the UK aims to amplify its investment in services tailored to the local market. The authorization by the FCA not only aligns Worldline with UK regulatory standards but also ensures uninterrupted services amid the closing of the Temporary Permission Regime.

With this license, Worldline can now offer domestic processing capabilities, addressing the market's changing needs with its fully in-house acquiring services. This move is expected to enhance transaction transparency and reliability for Worldline's customers.

“Worldline is committed to playing an important role in the post-Brexit payments landscape of the UK,” said Lee Jones, the CEO of Worldline Merchant Services UK.

An expanded UK-based team of Worldline professionals will utilize their market expertise to assist merchants in optimizing payment operations and costs. The new licence will enable merchants to benefit from optimized scheme fees and, with the assistance of advanced AI technologies, experience improved authorization rates.

“Paramount for our local service scope and excellence, it sets us apart from many international competitors by bolstering our presence and enhancing our service capabilities, while providing more choice for UK merchants,” Jones added.

Market Valuation Challenges for Worldline

Worldline recently announced a reduction in its sales forecast, causing concern within the European financial technology sector. The news led to a sharp decline in Worldline's shares, resulting in a loss of over half of its market capitalization, approximately €3.8 billion, and leaving the company with a valuation of approximately €2.7 billion. This significant devaluation reflects a growing trend of investor skepticism towards the long-term viability of fintech enterprises in Europe.

This unsettling update from Worldline arrived closely on the heels of a similar announcement by CAB Payments Plc, a UK-based company, which experienced a dramatic slump of 72% in its stock value following a downward revision of its revenue outlook. Furthermore, in August, the payment firm Adyen NV was subjected to a market sell-off after posting disappointing bi-annual results. These events have cumulatively contributed to a discernible shift in investor sentiment, marked by diminishing patience with the performance of fintech entities across Europe.

In light of these developments, data from KPMG's Pulse of Fintech report is particularly telling. While fintech investments totaled $63.2 billion over 2,885 deals in the latter half of 2022, these figures dropped to $52.4 billion through 2,153 deals in the first half of 2023. The report underscores a notable contraction in the sector, both in terms of capital inflow and deal volume.

!"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz{|} !"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz{|}