Coinbase refute hack claims, amidst appearance of usernames online

Another day, another Bitcoin story, with various parties claiming various things. This time, an anonymous user claims to have posted

Another day, another Bitcoin story, with various parties claiming various things.

This time, an anonymous user claims to have posted online a list of 2000 Coinbase usernames and their accompanying email addresses to Pastebin.com (basically an online text clipboard).

Join the iFX EXPO Asia and discover your gateway to the Asian Markets

Coinbase, one of a number of online wallet services for storing Bitcoins, has recently been getting a lot of positive press from different quarters, not least the news that Facebook’s Security Director Ryan McGeehan has recently joined them.

So it’s of no surprise that Coinbase has swiftly acted to squash this latest claim. They explained on their blog, that despite,

Suggested articles

B2BX Simplifies Access to Institutional Grade Liquidity for Crypto TradingGo to article >>

“the claim of a “leaked” list of Coinbase emails and user names. This list (the size of which is less than one half of one percent of Coinbase users) was not the result of a data breach at Coinbase. This list of emails was likely sourced from other sites – probably Bitcoin related ones. It’s clear there was no data breach because no other user information is provided.”

Ok, so there was no Coinbase hack, but that isn’t much of a consolation for those individuals whose emails have been publicly uploaded to Pastebin, since apparently, it’s possible for these members to be identified.

Yet that’s not where it ends. According to the anonymous uploader, Coinbase is actually under a “gag order”, whilst providing “your full transaction history to the FBI, FinCEN and IRS every day.”

DC Magnates is still attempting to ascertain whether this latter claim holds any validity. As of yet, Coinbase have not addressed this point in their aforementioned blog post.

Got a news tip? Let Us Know