Newsweek, Leah McGrath Goodman Respond to Critics

Newsweek has updated their now-viral article on Satoshi Nakamoto with a video interview with Leah McGrath Goodman, the investigator and

Newsweek has updated their now-viral article on Satoshi Nakamoto with a video interview with Leah McGrath Goodman, the investigator and author of the article. The interview was with the International Business Times and can be found on their website.

Interview with Leah McGrath Goodman

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Newsweek themselves have also published a piece dedicated to defending Goodman’s work.

The interview and article come in response to wave of controversy over the article and investigation. Associated Press had reported that Dorian Nakamoto denied any prior involvement with Bitcoin in their exclusive interview with him. Meanwhile, the “Satoshi Nakamoto” account on P2P Foundation issued a message declaring he is not Dorian Nakamoto.

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In the interview, Goodman was first asked if she anticipated such an explosive response. She responded that she expected a lot of discussion, but certainly didn’t foresee it being interpreted as an act of war on Bitcoin on Satoshi Nakamoto himself. In fact, she developed a fond and even protective sense toward them (One would note that the consensus of rational criticism on this front was merely that the article was far too invasive, and jeopardized the safety and well-being of Nakamoto and his family. For this, Bitcoiners voiced their support and solidarity with Nakamoto’s family)

She defended the level of information included in the report, noting that many details were omitted, such as the names of minors, and that things that shouldn’t be talked about, “weren’t talked about”. She referred to the allegation of hauling information onto the internet which was not yet there as a “fallacy”.

Asked if, in retrospect, she would change the way this was done, she referred to “things that I did not have control over in the story” that were adjusted “already”, which can happen when you put things on the internet. She acknowledged though that the Nakamoto vehicle’s license plate was intended to be blurred out and wasn’t due to a possible oversight. She expressed hope that the man should live the quiet and peaceful life he’s entitled to.

As to what this entails to the future of Bitcoin, Goodman said she was happy that the information was inspiring, “as it could have been so many other things”. There are still many unanswered questions and that this isn’t “the final word on Bitcoin”.

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