Quickbit Leaks Large Volume of Customer Data

Details of 300,000 transactions were freely available online

Swedish cryptocurrency market maker QuickBit issued a statement on Monday saying that some of its users’ data was exposed to hackers this month.

According to the statement, only two percent of the traders using the company’s services had their data exposed by the data breach.

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The database was first uncovered by Comparitech – a cybersecurity research company – and Bob Diachenko, a cybersecurity expert, in early July.

A report by Comparitech that was released on Monday indicates that the database which carried the users’ information was freely available online.

The database contained details of just over 300,000 transactions. For each one of those transactions, the database stated a user’s full name, address, email address, gender, date of birth, their payment information, the volumes involved in the transaction and what currencies were used.

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Who to trust?

In a statement issued in response to that report, QuickBit said that the data breach had affected just two percent of its clients. If that is the case then reports by other media outlets, which suggested the breach could have affected 300,000 people, are certain to be false.

Having said that, QuickBit also wrote in its statement that no passwords or private keys were revealed by the breach.

But in their report, Comparitech claimed to have found “143 records with internal credentials, including merchants, secret keys, names, passwords, secret phrases, user IDs, and other information.”

Whatever the case, the breach is the latest in a series of hacks and security breaches affecting the cryptocurrency market.

Earlier this month, Bitmarket, a Polish cryptocurrency exchange, shut down citing an inability to meet its obligations following a hack. That came on the heels of Bitrue also confirming that cyber attackers had stolen just under $30 million from its coffers.

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